Tuesday, 7 January 2014

Orange and Poppy Seed Cream Scones

I’m a little late, but happy New Year! I lost my car keys on January 1st and they turned out to be in my mums bag, OF ALL PLACES. 

I mean, who puts their keys in their mum’s bag at 4am on New Years Eve and then forgets? WHO? That’s not important, what happened before that incident was important. It involved flour and cream, additional flavours and the Kenwood KM330.  
So, lets kick off the year with scones, and not the kind that leave the roof of your mouth feeling scone-like. You know what I’m talking about, right - that seriously weird texture you get in your mouth after having a store bought scone? It’s the blindingly obvious indication that your scones weren’t really homemade from that seriously cute teahouse. 

Oh, the lies.

Scones were the first things I made in Food Technology (home ec) way back at the wee age of 11. I guess, the main reason why we made them had a lot to do with how darn easy they are to rustle up. Not to mention how delicious they are in that fattening and comforting kind of way.
From 2004 to 2013, scones involved cold butter, a knife and a tiny bit of elbow grease (by that I mean having floury hands and cutting shapes). In 2014, thanks to the Kenwood dough hook and the realization that you can produce a softer crumb with full fat cream instead of butter, the making of scones involves the flick of a button. Aaaaand the cutting of shapes that begged to be triangles but sadly, clearly, aren’t.

The trick is to let the dough hook run for half a second, until everything is just combined, because this is not breakfast brioche, but breakfast scones, studded with crunchy little poppy seeds and the faintest flavour of orange. You hardly know its there, but when you notice it; you’ll thank me for passively making you put it there.

If you don’t have a mixer, it should be your new years resolution to purchase one. But if you’re not buying it (geddit?), these beauts are made just as well by hand. Just pour your dry ingredients onto a surface, make a well, pour, knead and cut.  

Orange and Poppy Seed Cream Scones

2 cups plain flour
1/4 cup Demerara sugar
2 1/2 tsp baking powder
3 tbsp poppy seeds
zest and juice of 1 orange
1 1/4 cup double cream + extra for brushing scones

Note: The orange flavour in the scones is ever so subtle. If you're keen on your oranges, its best to add the juice and zest of 1 extra orange. Just sub 2 tbsp of cream for the extra orange
juice. 

Method

Line a baking tray with 2 layers of parchment paper. Add all of the dry ingredients, including the orange zest, into the bowl of a freestanding mixer fitted with the dough hook (or a normal bowl, just use a wooden spoon). Turn the mixer on low until everything looks evenly combined. Make a well in the centre of the bowl and pour in the cream and orange juice. Mix on medium until a dough is formed, about half a minute. The mixture will be sticky but don't worry! Flour a work surface and knead into a smooth ball. Squash the ball with your hands to form an 8.5 inch round. Use a bench scraper to cut 8 (or 12) triangle wedges. Place on the baking tray and leave to rest for 40 minutes. Brush each one with the leftover cream. Preheat the oven to 220 C and bake for 15 minutes.

Thank you to anyone who visited this mbakes in 2013. I hope you will come back this year, even if it’s just to laugh at my awfully composed and blurry pictures, thank you! Do you have any new years resolutions?
Love Em xx

16 comments:

  1. These look delicious, there is a woman in my office who makes THE BEST scones. I have given up trying to make them as they just don't compare. I have even used her recipe and they are just not as good. She obviously uses wizardry.

    I would never of even though of using my dough hook on scones though, always the paddle. Might need to give it a go.

    Happy New Year!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wizardry is the only other rational answer! Does she use a cold butter recipe?
      The dough hook worked a charm on these, they helped to pick up all the random bits of flour that the beater always misses. I've always had this fear that the beater adds extra gluten development to everything biscuit/dough-y I make! Happy new year to you, too :)

      Delete
  2. Happy New Year x Well those scones look a treat!! Also your pictures look absolutely stunning, what camera do you use???

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Happy new year to you, too! I use a Canon 60D, these pictures are so blurry tho, had some seriously bad light!

      Delete
  3. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I send a lot of love to your triangular, even though in a weird, yet nonconformist way, scones.
    Look yummy! ;)

    ReplyDelete
  5. Your pictures are amazing! Pipe down :)
    My kitchenaid is about to fall apart so I need to look into a new mixed and I'm considering a Kenwood. These scones look delicious. Scones were on my to bake list for this week as well.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Haha, thank you Sophie. The doillee totally added a cake hunter touch ;)
      This one im using in the pics is on sale at Argos at the moment !
      Let me know if you make scones, I'm sure they will look less retarded than mine :)

      Delete
  6. These look awesome, and I'm stealing that tip to use a dough hook for scone-y things. Seriously great photos.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Wow. I hardly ever make scones. You've made it sound really simple. Definitely inspired me to try more often!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Im glad to here! Such a simple breakfast treat

      Delete
  8. Those look truly delicious, I must make these!

    ReplyDelete
  9. Your photos are absolutely stunning and I think we love exactly the same food! I'm actually in love with your blog :) plus these scones look incredible!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Lillie ! I'm glad I found you too, cant wait for your next post :)

      Delete

Template by Pink + Lola