Goat's Milk Dulce De Leche Oreo Banoffee Tarts With Coconut Whipped Cream

Friday, 28 February 2014

On Sunday we sat down, scrolled through our Virgin Media Netflix and finally decided upon watching Armageddon. You know, that film with Bruce Willis running around all hot and angry whilst his daughter secretly kisses range boy Ben Affleck in his bed and Willis threatens to kill him. In the end, ol’ sexy Willis takes a lift down to the core of some meteorite and blows himself up, I think this was his way of giving his blessing, finally letting his daughter kiss Affleck till death do them part. His suicide act saves the world as well by the way, it’s beautiful, and anyone with eyes is capable of crying at this film. 
Unfortunately there is no hidden meaning behind my terrible synopsis and what’s going on in my life right now, I just thought I’d tell you about a film that’s been playing on my mind all week. Hopefully I can stop having visions of Willis now, please god.
Earlier that day, I baked the healthiest cookies - they contained no flour, no sugar, and zilch eggs! Just maple sweetness and oat flour, and a few hundred calories from the rich macadamias and chips of white chocolate, and they were nearly all eaten by the time we sat down to scroll through the endless list of films on the ol’ Netflix.
Naturally, this is the bit where I carry on telling you about how good these cookies were, and below there would be the recipe for them. And yes, they were really delicious, but they were also pretty damn ugly and so flat, that when you picked them up they fell to pieces and the macadamias looked like overgrown warts about to pop on a witch’s face. No camera angle or £14 dishcloth could do them justice, so I’m sharing our dessert from the previous Saturday instead, whilst I work on a solution to make these coconut oil laden discs more plump and cookie-esque, like The Flourishing Foodie's Maple Pecan Cookies.

These tarts are filled with a labour of love: homemade dulce de leche made with goats milk. They can taste so goat-y, but different brands have different goat tasting levels so try to use mild milk. The blended banana also goes a long way in softening the goat-y edge. And if the butter to biscuit ratio in the base looks a little frightening, it’s there to help you get over the fact that goat’s milk tastes like farm. Of course, you could just use cow’s milk, but goat’s milk adds a complexity to dulce de leche, one that cow’s milk will never succumb to.


Goat's Milk Dulce De Leche Oreo Banoffee Tarts With Coconut Whipped Cream

Makes five deep tartlets, eight regular tartlets or one 23cm tart.

Dulce De Leche
2 pints goat’s or cows milk 
Pinch of sea salt 
1 cinnamon stick (optional)
1 cup caster sugar 
¼ tsp bicarbonate of soda in 2 tbsp water
1 banana
Base
1 cup Oreos
½ cup butter, melted
Topping
2 x 400g can coconut milk, refrigerated for 12 hours
Pinch cream of tartar 
Grated dark chocolate shavings 

Bring the milk, salt, cinnamon and sugar to a simmer in a heavy bottomed saucepan on low heat. Take off the heat and slowly add the bicarbonate of soda and water: this has to be added drop by drop to stop the mixture foaming rapidly. Keep the mixture at a medium-low heat, stirring occasionally until it turns a light brown, this will take about 1 hour 30 minutes. Stir the mixture every ten minutes, until it turns a light shade of brown. As soon as it starts to thicken, stir continuously until it’s a deep red colour. Take off the heat as soon as the caramel reaches copper-red. If the mixture is lumpy strain it through a sieve, then pour into a sterilised jar and refrigerate once cooled. 

Pulse Oreos in a food processer fitted with a blade attachment until just broken up. Slowly pour in the melted butter, keep pulsing until a wet and crumbly dough forms. Alternatively bash biscuits to a fine crumb with a rolling pin and stir in the butter. Divide the crumbs into five deep (or seven regular sized) loose-bottomed pastry cases and use a spoon to press the mixture around the sides and bottom. Refrigerate for one hour. 

In a large bowl add cooled dulce de leche and the banana, use a hand blender to combine the two until the banana is completely immersed in with the caramel. Or mash banana with a fork and fold through caramel. 

Take the coconut milk out of the fridge, open the can and separate the water from the blob of cream built up on top. Place the coconut ‘blobs’ into a bowl with cream of tartar and whisk until soft peaks form. 


Pour the banana filling into the pastry cases up to two thirds full. Spoon the coconut whipped cream on top, sprinkle with chocolate shavings and leave to set in the fridge for one hour before serving. 
Love Em xx

19 comments:

  1. I remember the first time I saw that film, in all its big screen glory with the theme tune 'I don't want to miss a thing' in all ITS power balled glory and being absolutely utterly transfixed- I haven't seen it for years...good movie choice! And what glorious puddings and photos

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    1. kate, you're so right, it is the father of epic films!!

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  2. I have made many a cookie like that! So delicious, yet impossible actually eat as a cookie--more like a pile of cookie pieces, better eaten out of a bowl. These tartlets, though, are so pretty! And I'm sure delicious as well.

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    1. It's like the indications that you have failed as a cookie maker! I thought about adding the pieces to ice cream or something.... nope, when they're breaking apart, just let it be! ha

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  3. Oh my god. Oh my god. Oh my god. I can't... even form words right now. These look so good... and GOAT'S milk dulce de leche? I think I just fell in love. This might be my dessert soulmate. PS "overgrown warts about to pop on a witch's face" made me lol.

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    1. I added a whole goat to dulce de leche would you believe!
      :)

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  4. Droool! These look gorgeous and the goats milk dulche de leche sounds amazing. Your pictures are gorgeous :)

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  5. Hehe ... I'm afraid I would have to make the dulce de leche with cow's milk. I can't eat most goat's cheese because of that 'goaty farm' taste. But these cute little tarts look absolutely sublime, and I love your photos!

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  6. My gosh these tarts look so delicious! I watched the strangest Bruce Willis film on a bus in Thailand once and I couldn't stop thinking about it for weeks...

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  7. OH EM GEE these look amazing. I love that they are no bake x

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  8. Oh my, these are gorgeous!! Fantastic way to fancy up the good old banofee pie!

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  9. Thank you Trisha & Jess, it was the most spruced up B pie i've ever made !

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  10. Wait, wait, what were you saying about your photos being "dark" and "moody"????? That must have been someone else because these are absolutely gooooooorgeous. How could they not be when your food is so incredibly lovely! What camera are you using these days?

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  11. how many tarts will this make? and what size tart shell did you use?

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    1. Hi Hannah,
      I used 10cm tart shells, but they were really really deep so the crust makes enough for 5 deep 10cm tart shells. If you use regular size, it could easily make enough for 7/8. I had a little bit of dulce left over as well. But the coconut milk amounts were perfect :)

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    2. Also, if you wanted to make 1 whole tart (23cm) then you could, with some leftover!

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    3. thanks so much:) using this recipe as a (pastry) school dessert item product :)

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